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Stingray shuffle is key for beachgoers

Stingray shuffle is key for beachgoers

Stingray season has started early this year. One person has been stung on Clearwater Beach so far, and more likely will get stung as the stingrays migrate north. Purple warning flags warn of the danger of stingrays in area waters. Flags currently are up and will be flown as needed.

It is important for all beachgoers to do the “stingray shuffle” when entering beach waters. By shuffling your feet in the sand, you will scare off any stingrays that might be around.

Aquarium to teach about rehabilitating dolphins

Aquarium to teach about rehabilitating dolphins

Clearwater, Florida - Join Clearwater Marine Aquarium this Thursday, March 17 to learn “All About Dolphins.”

This month’s Making Waves presentation will focus on how Clearwater Marine Aquarium’s staff and volunteers rehabilitate and train rescued dolphins as well as a discussion about dolphin behavior in the wild. Enjoy updates on Winter, Panama, Indy, Nicholas and an introduction to our orphaned Atlantic bottlenose dolphin calf, who has just recently joined the CMA resident family. CMA Marine Mammal Trainer Cindy Farber and Director of Education Joe Malo will lead the presentation.

“All About Dolphins” will include the following:

Young amputee athlete to meet 'Winter' today

Young amputee athlete to meet 'Winter' today

Clearwater, Florida -- A ten year old boy with prosthetic legs will visit 'Winter,' the dolphin with a prosthetic tail at the Clearwater Marine Aquarium today.

Cody McCassland was born prematurely without a tibia and knee on both the right and left side, requiring a bi-lateral amputation when he was only 2 years old. Within two months, he was walking on prosthetic legs.

Despite that and other childhood medical issues, he became active in horseback riding, gymnastics, t-ball, soccer, swimming, running, golf, and even flying a plane.

Safety Harbor now safer harbor for ospreys

Safety Harbor now safer harbor for ospreys

Safety Harbor, Florida - It took some special equipment, but not much money, to make Safety Harbor a safer harbor for ospreys.

"This is a happy day," says Audubon activist Barb Walker. She is indeed happy to watch ospreys fly at City Park and city workers take to the air as well, to install some new equipment on the tall lights there.

Last month, it was a much different scene. That's when a lightning rod on top of a baseball field light punctured the wing of an osprey. Walker could only watch the bird futilely flap its wings trying to free itself.

"It was an awful thing to see," says Walker. "I was with the bird when it died and it pretty much struggled up to the point it slipped into a coma and perished."

What you need to know about coyotes in Dunedin

What you need to know about coyotes in Dunedin

Dunedin, Florida -- The City of Dunedin recently posted information from the Dunedin nature Center which offers a response to the coyote sightings around Dunedin:

Where did the coyotes come from?

Once strictly a western species, coyotes began expanding eastward with the decline of wolves in the U.S.Coyotes first appeared in northwestern Florida in the 1970s, and now occur all over the state.

What do they eat?

Much like pigs, coyotes will eat just about anything. Their diet consists of whatever is easiest to find or catch-rodents, rabbits, fruits, insects, birds and carrion are their preferred food, but they will turn to cats, small dogs and small livestock if nothing else is available.

Lightning rod in Safety Harbor may have impaled osprey

Lightning rod in Safety Harbor may have impaled osprey

Safety Harbor, Florida - Days later, feathers remain strewn on the ground, a female osprey looks for her missing mate and Audubon activist Barb Walker can't shake the memory of what she saw Friday some 75 feet up in the air.

"He was just hanging right there," Walker says, pointing to the top of a baseball field light pole. "He was dangling and struggling, feathers on the ground and it was a very sad thing. It was a very sad thing."

Photo Gallery: Impaled Osprey

It's impossible to say exactly what happened but, from photographs, it appears the bird was either impaled or its landing hampered by a metal spike, a lightning rod, on top of the light pole. "It wasn't a very good interaction with the pole, that's for sure," says Walker.